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The Adventures of Colonel Daniel Boone

By: John Filson

Curiosity is natural to the soul of man, and interesting objects have a powerful influence on our affections. Let these influencing powers actuate, by the permission or disposal of Providence, from selfish or social views, yet in time the mysterious will of Heaven is unfolded, and we behold our conduct, from whatsoever motives excited, operating to answer the important designs of heaven. Thus we behold Kentucke, lately an howling wilderness, the habitation of savages and...

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New Views of the Constitution

By: John Taylor

PREFACE: THAT many eminent and respectable men have ever preferred, and ever will prefer, a consolidated national government to our federal system; that the constitution, under the influence of this predilection, has been erroneously construed; that these constructions are rapidly advancing towards their end, whether it shall be consolidation or disunion; that they will become a source of excessive geographical discord; and that the happiness and prosperity of the United...

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Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine

By: George M. Gould

PREFATORY AND INTRODUCTORY. Since the time when man’s mind first busied itself with subjects beyond his own self-preservation and the satisfaction of his bodily appetites, the anomalous and curious have been of exceptional and persistent fascination to him; and especially is this true of the construction and functions of the human body. Possibly, indeed, it was the anomalous that was largely instrumental in arousing in the savage the attention, thought, and investigation...

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Sketches by Boz

By: Charles Dickens

Excerpt: THE BEADLE. The PARISH ENGINE. The SCHOOLMASTER. How much is conveyed in those two short words?'The Parish!? And with how many tales of distress and misery, of broken fortune and ruined hopes, too often of unrelieved wretchedness and successful knavery, are they associated! A poor man, with small earnings, and a large family, just manages to live on from hand to mouth, and to procure food from day to day; he has barely sufficient to satisfy the present cravings ...

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Captains Courageous

By: Rudyard Kipling

The weather door of the smoking-room had been left open to the North Atlantic fog, as the big liner rolled and lifted, whistling to warn the fishing-fleet. That Cheyne boy's the biggest nuisance aboard, said a man in a frieze overcoat, shutting the door with a bang. He isn't wanted here. He's too fresh. A white-haired German reached for a sandwich, and grunted between bites: I know der breed. Ameriga is full of dot kind. I dell you you should imbort ropes' ends free under your dariff....

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The Spoils of Poynton

By: Henry James

MrsGereth had said she would go with the rest to church, but suddenly it seemed to her that she should not be able to wait even till church-time for relief: breakfast, at Waterbath, was a punctual meal, and she had still nearly an hour on her hands. Knowing the church to be near, she prepared in her room for the little rural walk, and on her way down again, passing through corridors and observing imbecilities of decoration, the æsthetic misery of the big commodious house...

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Victory

By: Joseph Conrad

Excerpt: NOTE TO THE FIRST EDITION THE last word of this novel was written on 29 May 1914. And that last word was the single word of the title. Those were the times of peace. Now that the moment of publication approaches I have been considering the discretion of altering the title?page. The word ?Victory? the shining and tragic goal of noble effort, appeared too great, too august, to stand at the head of a mere novel. There was also the possibility of falling under the s...

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Arcadian Adventures with the Idle Rich

By: Stephen Leacock

Excerpt: THE Mausoleum Club stands on the quietest corner of the best residential street in the City. It is a Grecian building of white stone. About it are great elm trees with birds the most expensive kind of birds singing in the branches. The street in the softer hours of the morning has an almost reverential quiet. Great motors move drowsily along it, with solitary chauffeurs returning at 10.30 after conveying the earlier of the millionaires to their downtown offices....

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The Heroes, Or, Greek Fairy Tales for My Children

By: Charles Kingsley

Some of you have heard already of the old Greeks; and all of you, as you grow up, will hear more and more of them. Those of you who are boys will, perhaps, spend a great deal of time in reading Greek books; and the girls, though they may not learn Greek, will be sure to come across a great many stories taken from Greek history, and to see, I may say every day, things which we should not have had if it had not been for these old Greeks.

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The Shape of Fear and Other Ghostly Tales

By: Elia Wilkinson Peattie

Excerpt: THE SHAPE OF FEAR TIM O'CONNOR ? who was descended from the O'Conors with one N ? started life as a poet and an enthusiast. His mother had designed him for the priesthood, and at the age of fifteen, most of his verses had an ecclesiastical tinge, but, somehow or other, he got into the newspaper business instead, and became a pessimistic gentleman, with a literary style of great beauty and an income of modest proportions. He fell in with men who talked of art for...

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The Cost

By: David Graham Phillips

Excerpt: Pauline Gardiner joined us on the day that we, the Second Reader class, moved from the basement to the top story of the old Central Public School. Her mother brought her and, leaving, looked round at us, meeting for an instant each pair of curious eyes with friendly appeal.

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Women and Public Housekeeping

By: Jane Addams

Excerpt: A city is in many respects a great business corporation, but in other re? spects it is enlarged housekeeping. If American cities have failed in the first, partly because officeholders have carried with them the predatory instinct learned in competitive business, and cannot help ?working a good thing? when they have an opportunity, may we not say that city housekeeping has failed partly because women, the traditional housekeepers, have not been consulted as to it...

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Company Manners

By: Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

Victor Cousin, the French philosopher, has undertaken a new task within the last few years. Whether as a relaxation from, or a continuation of, his study of metaphysics, I do not know, but he has begun to write the biographies of some of the celebrated French women of the seventeenth century. In making out his list, he is careful to distinguish between authoresses and femnes d'esprit ranking the latter infinitely the higher in every point of view. The first of his series...

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Libro Segundo de Lectura

By: Ellen M. Cyr

Excerpt: Didn?t you know? Mary and I are going to play with our dolls. Have you seen my new doll?? ?No, I don?t think I have. Did mamma give you that doll?? ?Yes, she gave it to me on my birthday. You know I am six years old now.? ?What a pretty doll! Where is your doll?s hat?? ?She hasn't any hat, grandpa.? ?Your poor doll will take cold. Ask grandma to make one for her. I know she will.?

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Bunner Sisters

By: Edith Wharton

Excerpt: Part 1. I In the days when New York?s traffic moved at the pace of the drooping horse?car, when society applauded Christine Nilsson at the Academy of Music and basked in the sunsets of the Hudson River School on the walls of the National Academy of Design, an inconspicuous shop with a single show?window was intimately and favourably known to the feminine population of the quarter bordering on Stuyvesant Square. It was a very small shop, in a shabby basement, in ...

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An Address to the Inhabitants of the Colonies, Established in New ...

By: Richard Johnson

But since that period, we have gradually increased in number every year (notwithstanding the great mortality we have sometimes known) by the multitudes that have been sent hither after us. The colony already begins to spread, and will probably spread more and more every year, both by new settlements formed in different places under the crown, and by a number of individuals continually becoming settlers. Thus the extent of what I call my parish, and consequently of my par...

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Calidore

By: Thomas Love Peacock

Excerpt: Chapter One. NOTWITHSTANDING the great improvements of machinery in this rapidly improving age, which is so much wiser, better, and happier than all that went before it, every gentleman is not yet accommodated with the convenience of a pocket boat.* We may therefore readily imagine that Miss Ap?Nanny and her sister Ellen, the daughters of the Vicar of Llanglasrhyd, were not a little astonished in a Sunday evening walk on the sea shore, when a little skiff, which...

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Quality and Other Essays

By: John Galsworthy

Excerpt: QUALITY. I knew him from the days of my extreme youth, because he made my father?s boots; inhabiting with his elder brother two little shops let into one, in a small by?street?now no more, but then most fashionably placed in the West End. That tenement had a certain quiet distinction; there was no sign upon its face that he made for any of the Royal Family merely his own German name of Gessler Brothers; and in the window a few pairs of boots. I remember that it ...

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How I Went Out to Service

By: Louisa May Alcott

Excerpt: When I was eighteen I wanted something to do. I had tried teaching for two years, and hated it; I had tried sewing, and could not earn my bread in that way, at the cost of health; I tried story?writing and got five dollars for stories which now bring a hundred; I had thought seriously of going upon the stage, but certain highly respectable relatives were so shocked at the mere idea that I relinquished my dramatic aspirations. ?What shall I do?? was still the que...

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French Life

By: Elizabeth Gaskell

Excerpt: Paris, February, 1862. We went to?day along the Boulevard Sevastopol, Rive Gauche, to pay a call. I knew the district well about six years ago, when it was a network of narrow tortuous streets; the houses high, irregular, picturesque, historical, dirty, and unhealthy. I used to have much difficulty in winding my way to certain points in the Quartier Latin from the Faubourg St. Germain, where I was staying. Now, the Hotel Cluny is enclosed in a neat garden, the r...

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